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Israel’s Homeschool Curriculum

Israel’s Homeschool Curriculum

Several people have asked what homeschool curriculum I am currently using with Israel. I’ve used a variety of supplemental stuff, but I’d like to give you a quick overview of the main things I’m using right now. He’s still only 3 years old, so we try to have fun with it and not make it too hard. My mom, mother-in-law and sister-in-law (Anna) have been very helpful, as well as other teachers and homeschooling friends of mine! Israel loves when he gets new workbooks and school supplies, so I have added them to his Christmas and birthday lists sometimes too! There are so many curriculums out there! You don’t have to stick with the same one for everything! Growing up, my mom used several different curriculums for different subjects and grade levels. Sometimes she even tried out a new curriculum when she thought a child might learn better with a different teaching style.

Before I list the different curriculums I’m using right now, I just wanted to say that you can get all of these things through the companies individual sites or from www.christianbook.com (I don’t make anything from any of them).

MATH: For math right now, I’m using the Math-U-See primer workbook (it comes with an instructor’s manual and dvd too!) and their company’s manipulatives integer block kit.

PHONICS: I started with Sing, Spell, Read & Write’s (S,S,R&W) first book in their Kindergarten and Level 1 combo kit to teach Israel the letter sounds (kinda an old curriculum, but it works well!), then I have briefly switched to Siegfried Engelmann’s “Teach Your Child To Read In 100 Easy Lessons” book. Once we finish this (should be done this week!), then we plan to finish out phonics with S,S,R&W.

READING: As Israel is learning to read, there are lots of books he has enjoyed reading (S,S,R&W comes with several reader books in their kit!). Anna (my SIL) told me about the BOB books and Israel loves them! There are several in each set (the pic below is just one of many sets/boxes with lots of little books in each one). And they are nice and short, so they help him stay motivated because the goals are achievable!

Right now, I focus mainly on math and teaching him to read and write. I do incorporate a little science and social studies, but this mainly consists of watching a short educational video on YouTube together and then doing a craft, project, or exploring something that relates to it. I have found www.teacherspayteachers.com (thanks Amber;-) ) to be extremely helpful in finding fun resources that correlate with something I want him to learn. And their emails I’ve signed up for help me remember all the holidays and the fun things we can to do make learning about them exciting without having to break the bank!

I like to make a little checklist chart (like my mom did for us when we were kids) and we check it off throughout the day…yes, I’m one of those people…lol…I write stuff down just so I can check it off! Anybody with me? haha

Israel also has a “chore pack:” little laminated cards that are stuffed inside a little plastic name tag with drawings of each of his chores on them (since he can’t quite read everything yet!) and the name of the chore/school subject with a number for the order in which it should be completed. Some of Israel’s cards purposely don’t have numbers on them so I can rearrange them however I want him to complete them that day…then I just have him check in between every card swap. He doesn’t always clip it on his clothes during the day. Sometimes we just keep it clipped on the wall and switch them out as we go through them. I first learned of the chore packs when my mom did them with some of my younger siblings. The idea came from Steve and Teri Maxwell (www.chorepacks.com).

I am continuing to find out that there are so many great and fun ways to help your kiddos learn! I’m sure many of y’all have great tips and I’d love to hear them! 🙂

What are some of your favorite school curriculums for different grade levels as well as any inspirational tips and/or books for homeschooling moms/teachers? Leave me a comment in the section below.

The photos above are considered the property of the Dillard Family and may only be used with their written permission. Please request permission to use the photos.

90 Comments

  1. Linda Bobo Reddoch

    I am a firm believer in Sing Spell Read and Write! I’ve taught my younger three to read using that curriculum.
    We use Christian Light Education for Reading, Language arts, and math. We will continue with those through to graduation.
    We will start using A Beka this fall for history, health, and science.
    I wish you and your sweet family all the best!

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Linda,
      Nice! I remember doing some Abeka as a kid. I like how orderly they are too. Haven’t decided on what I’m gonna do for history and science and all…leaning toward Apologia, but idk.

      Reply
      • Ashley Brown

        I lived apologia! And if one day you are looking into science curriculum, “enjoy science” by Richard Hawkins and his family designed it around creationism. He actually used to believe in science but he found Christ and made this program! Great foundation! Congratulations on choosing homeschooling! Prayers sent for you now momma!

        Reply
  2. Jessica

    Love your picks. We have been homeschooling for almost 17 years. Some of my favorites for the younger grades have been Memoria Press, CLE for English and Math. Also Notgrass for History, and Apologia for Science. Your family is beautiful. Looks like he is going to have lots of fun with his new curriculum. We also use CBD and Rainbow Reasource for our book ordering. Happy homeschooling.

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Awesome! How did you like Apologia? Did you feel like it was good for science preparedness for college? I just really want to have something that will help our kids get excited about science and help me know they’ll be prepared. 😉 🙂 I’ve heard they take a Charlotte Mason approach to learning (lots of exploring and encourage free study), but I’m also a person who kinda needs some structure, so hoping I can get both. 🙂

      Reply
      • Jessica

        I have tried Abeka, and Apologia, and MFW for science. In the younger years, Apologia is very hands on and teacher friendly. We started using the notebook journals and the kids that like the Charlotte Mason approach really like them. My other kiddos that want to just get the work done don’t enjoy them as much lol. My older two used Apologia Biology and Anatomy, they liked it, but to get the college prep you really need to do the labs and have a good kit to go with them. We used The new Chemistry by Dr. Wile, it’s very similar to Apologia but with better explanations imho. I totally understand where you’re coming from. I really want my kids to have what they need for college level science. We liked Abeka in the younger grades but the kids seemed to retain more from the Apologia. I hope you find something that works for you. I have heard good things about Berean Builders and like the added history approach but haven’t tried them yet. Apologia so far has been the one science my kids ask for and enjoy doing. I need structure too or things don’t seem to get done. Enjoy the young years, they go by fast. My oldest got into college with no problem, did great on her SATs, but didn’t go into a science field. My Second will be applying to A Mortuary Science College next year and I think Apologia has prepared her well. 🙂

        Reply
        • Derick & Jill

          Yay! Thanks so much! This is super helpful!!

          Reply
  3. Stephanie

    I have also started to use a white board this helps switche it up and the kids love it.

    Reply
  4. Cara

    I am a teacher and love the resources on teachers pay teachers! When he is older BrainPOP and BrainPOP Jr are good online resources. A lot of it is free. My school
    Does subscribe. When mine were younger I ordered Little Passports monthly and a box from KiwiCrate . Those were fun and engaging. A great birthday gift is a subscription for those! Good luck!

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Ooh! Love the b’day gift idea for the subscription boxes!! And thanks for the suggestions! I love looking into different things…and especially when they’re free resources! 😉

      Reply
  5. Norine

    We have also done many different curriculums, but I seem to always go back to Abeka. I don’t buy the lesson plans or teacher guides. We just tailor it to fit each child. I have 2, that also love workbooks! I’m all for whatever keeps them motivated, and learning to love learning! Great job!!! We also like to avoid common core.

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Nice! Yeah, I tend to like some structure since I’m a very task/goal oriented person lol. Thanks for the suggestions!

      Reply
  6. Casey

    Thanks for sharing things like this, Jill. I have a two year old who is in speech therapy for a language delay, and I’m about to make him some pictures similar to the ones in Israel’s chore packs to help him connect names of things we do through out our day with what they are (like bath, nap, snacks, dinner options, toys we play with, books, etc). I’m planning to homeschool my boys and so with my older two year old, I’m starting to think about things we can get started on within the next year. These are some good ideas.

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Aww. Glad you enjoyed the post. Hope you’re able to find some curriculum that you like! I really enjoy just browsing the Christian Book website and also found some helpful guides online to choosing the curriculum based on kids personalities and your teaching style. 🙂

      Reply
  7. Laura

    We use Sonlight, Singapore, and Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons (Plus the Bob books, too!)! My son thinks homeschooling is a reward right now, so chores get done so that he GETS to homeschool! ❤️

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Haha that’s so great! Israel begs to do school too because at the end he gets a prize! (…but that’s not to say he doesn’t want to give up sometimes in the middle of it though lol)

      Reply
    • DEbbi

      Jill, Congrats on your preschool beginnings at home. It’s awesome. As the mom of a Senior in high school, I can honestly say homeschooling is the way to go. During my daughter’s middle school years her math curriculum was changed 4 times (in 3 years). Plus she was part of a test group who tested 6 different math curriculums in 7th grade. Additionally, I noted a reading decline in fourth grade due to lack of vocabulary being taught. Vocab started in 7th grade, long after reading enthusiasm ebbs. And in 4th grade, I received a note explaining that my daughter needed to be taught cursive. They Failed to teach it in 3rd grade. By 10th grade, I had reached my wits end with public school and put her in a small private school. I worked full time so homeschooling never seemed possible, but I wish I had done it. Public school failed her terribly. I thank God daily for her new high school and her God given ability to 9vercome ineptitude because she is doing very well and is headed to college in the fall. Which college is still undecided. Good luck with your homeschool adventure.

      Reply
      • Derick & Jill

        Aww. Thanks for the encouragement! Sounds like you have overcome some obstacles and both of y’all have been very diligent and determined. 🙂

        Reply
  8. Debora

    We really love logic of English for reading. It teaches them the phonograms sounds opposed to memorization.
    I also liked Math Right Start but it took to much planning for us. It’s very game based. I went back to life pac which is little workbooks and didn’t overwhelm my oldest.

    Thanks for sharing this!

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Oh yes! Some of my siblings did the life pacs through Alpha Omega. I liked how everything was in their little box and very organized and easy to see what all they needed to work through. 🙂 Again, very nice for us planners! 😉

      Reply
    • Meryl

      We also love Logic of English Foundations. Denise Eide’s book was really eye opening. I was always a terrible speller. The curriculum addresses so many areas in each lesson – grammar, spelling, pronunciation, phonetic awareness, etc. I also love the games that get my twins out of their seats. Tactile & fun.

      Reply
      • Derick & Jill

        Thanks!

        Reply
  9. Kari

    With my older son I used the ACE program. But I’m excited to try out the sing spell read and write curriculum with my now 2 year old. When did you start Israel on the first book of SSRW bundle?

    Reply
    • Kari

      Also did you do the SSRW preschool portion or jump right into kindergarten and level 1? Thanks, Kari

      Reply
      • Derick & Jill

        I just started with the kindergarten and level 1 kit…I found that this box still starts out with teaching the alphabet (actually kinda repeats it a couple times). And you can totally go at your own pace and repeat concepts until they “get it.” 🙂

        Reply
        • Kari

          Oh that’s good to know! Ok I’ll start with the kindergarten & level 1. We also do chorepacks and love them! Titus 2 has so many good resources. Btw I also love checkmarks :).

          Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Nice! My mom used the ACE paces for most of us older kids when we were growing up…they’re also less expensive than some of the other curriculums! Love that there are 12 per grade, so it keeps you motivated as you complete each little book. 🙂 Also love the scripture memory verses and of course the comics that grow with the grades. 😉 I know that now my mom uses “Teaching Textbook” for the older kids math and it is super helpful in selfstudy/explaining the concepts for upper level math and comes with dvds and all!

      Reply
      • Kari

        Yes my kids have loved the ACE paces. I haven’t heard of teaching textbooks. What grade level does she start it with? I’ll have to research them. Thanks Jill for the info! Kari

        Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Oh, and I started Israel on SSR&W I think it was just after he turned 3…but he was advanced in his language skills. Each kid will be a little different I’m sure. 🙂

      Reply
  10. Julie

    Love Math U See for the younger grades. My older kids use Teaching Textbooks. My Father’s World has been great as well. Easy Grammar and Essentials in Writing are great. Homeschool mom of 4 kids for 10 years now.

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Nice! Yeah, I certainly want them to be good at writing, especially as they prepare for higher education! Thanks for the suggestions/tips!

      Reply
  11. Holly

    We have used Christian Light Education for Math and Classical Conversations with my son for years! So thankful for our homeschool journey! I’m looking forward to offically starting up for our middle child who will be in Kindergarten this fall.

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Awesome! I’ve heard of those but I’m not super familiar with them. 🙂 Thanks for the suggestions!

      Reply
  12. Lindsay

    I love All All Reading and All About Spelling, you should check those out! Love the Bob books too!

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Ok. Thanks! I’m totally gonna have to look over all of these suggestions! 🙂 Love hearing what other people use!

      Reply
    • Celina

      I discovered the All About Reading this year and I loved it!! I’m using it for my son next year as well Tor the pre reading.

      Reply
  13. Sarah

    I wish I’d have known about Math U See when my boys were little. Instead, we did things the hard an inefficient way, lol. Since, I’ve settled on CLE in the early years, switching to Teaching Textbooks when they’re ready (about 3rd grade). Reading we use All About Reading. It’s the best I’ve found. I like the Pathway Readers and BOB books for extra practice. I love what Sarah McKenzie writes about the little years. Having 3 older kids, then a second batch of little ones, I find so much wisdom in what she writes. https://readaloudrevival.com/early-years/

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Thanks so much! I appreciate all the feedback and I’m gonna have fun looking into all of these suggestions! 🙂

      Reply
  14. Maria

    We enjoyed Story of the World for history. The activity book that goes alongside made it super fun. IEW for writing (the Institure for Excellence in Writing). We started that at 8 but they do have ones for younger. Apologia junior books and journals for science. Math U See for up to middle school. All Christian based. We then moved to online maths from grade 7 up. Just a suggestion if there is a safe way to do it, when you study history/geography there are people who follow you from all round the world who could send coins, craft activities, cultural info or recipes etc… from the region you are studying eg. We’re from New Zealand. Enjoy your homeschool journey, ours are all teens now so it’s finishing up soon and has flown by.

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Thanks! So many great resources! And that’s a neat idea about connecting with people in other countries. 🙂

      Reply
  15. ESS

    Bob Books are excellent for emerging readers! My Teachers Pay Teachers store is all but empty (not sure how some teachers upload so much!) but I do have a series of phonics puzzles that help students learn to group word families (like those followed by Bob Books), and the Short E puzzle set is free! There are a lot of ways to play with them…my students really enjoy the “hide and seek” method and the “memory” versions in the directions https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Room-To-Grow

    Also, Mystery Science is currently doing free one year memberships for teachers and new homeschooling parents. It’s based on questions, explorations, and structured hands-on activities, and it’s been awesome so far. Starts at the Kindergarten level, where kids might learn to answer a question like “Why is snow white?” or “How could you warm up a frozen playground?” All aligned with the next generation science standards, too. http://mys.ci/r/46890550

    Reply
    • ESS

      (Also, I just realized that kind of sounded like an ad, but I have no stake in Mystery Science haha…just something another teacher shared with me that I’ve found useful!)

      Reply
      • Derick & Jill

        haha totally fine! 🙂

        Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Oh! Love it! I’ll have to look into that! Thanks!

      Reply
      • ESS

        For sure 🙂 Soooo many great resources out there! A couple more I remembered–

        Twinkl.com, which started in the UK, has great stuff for Early Childhood and Kinder, though there’s a small monthly fee. Their social studies materials for little ones are well designed (super visual), and align nicely with lots of free stuff from Teachers Pay Teachers.

        GetEpic.com also has lots of books on all topics, and curates book lists on different themes (e.g. books about landforms or books about MLK Jr). They update regularly so it’s like a little in-home library.

        And finally, there are great magazines to spark early interest in learning…Ranger Rick Jr for science, Ladybug for literacy and art, etc. Libraries often have some. I really want to get some subscriptions for my classroom, but I’ve already spent too much out of pocket this year. Loved getting them in the mail as a kid, though!

        Enjoy 🙂

        Reply
        • Derick & Jill

          Awesome! Thanks! 🙂

          Reply
    • ESS

      So, I didn’t even realize Mystery Science was a referral link because it’s not a referral program lol. But, I just noticed in my email that a LOT of people signed up, so I thought I’d come back and note some things that I’ve found useful for anyone else who drops into these comments and stumbles on the link :). Hopefully it’ll help you get the most out of it more quickly.

      -If your kids are younger or not yet reading/writing, and even the Kindergarten lessons are a little much, check out the mini lesson section! The videos are super quick and are great starting points for discovery. Because they focus on every day topics (ways to recycle plastic, why we get hiccups, why donuts are called donuts, etc) it’s easy to think up fun activities to pair with them. I actually teach special needs, so even though my students are mid-elementary, these shorter lessons are very helpful.

      -If you plan to do a lot of the hands-on explorations, start saving your recycling because it’s useful to have various containers and such for many of them. This is probably a bit easier for homeschooling families, but as a classroom teacher it can take a while to accumulate materials and recycling helps with less out of pocket spending.

      -Make sure to check out the extras sections after the videos! It’s not just additional activities–there are also links to useful books and videos kids can read and watch to learn more about topics they like.

      -Click the “ask anything” button and your students can submit their questions to possibly be answered in a video (and vote on questions from other kids)! My class is crossing their fingers for a video on how sugar is made :).

      The common goal of every teacher, public/private/home, is to make sure kids get the most thorough, strong education they can, so sharing stuff like this is so important :).

      Reply
  16. Becky

    KiwiCo boxes are really cool! Alyssa Webster uses them for her 3 girls and it’s so fun to see the different themes each month. The boxes can be curated specifically for Israel’s age group, and for Samuel as well if you want to get him started. 🙂

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Nice! Yeah, I think I’ve seen her talk about those…I’m adding them to the boy’s running gift lists!

      Reply
  17. Sarah L

    The Christian school I went to for grades 6-8 used mostly A Beka curriculum. I ended up at a public highschool for grades 9-12, and I was way ahead of my classmates for grammar. I still get compliments on my penmanship as well! I was behind in science and social studies, but caught up quickly.

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Ah! Good to know! 🙂

      Reply
  18. Regina Shea

    Jill when I first started homeschooling my girls when they were little we used Rod and Staff, Christian Light and some Abeka. We also did a unit study called The Prairie Primer using all the Laura Ingalls Wilder books. They were fun to do.

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Nice. Thanks!

      Reply
  19. Mindy

    3 and starting to read? That’s amazing! I like the BOB books suggestion. Do you plan to use ATI curriculum in the future? Does Anna use ATI wisdom booklets?

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Yep…but like I said, he was already ahead of the curve in speaking for awhile, so he was ready!
      I’m not sure if Anna does. I’m not currently using them. 🙂

      Reply
  20. JULIA

    We’ve been homeschooling for 9 years now. As my kids got older and I discovered their learning styles that was the best help in finding curriculum. So the Holy Spirit and knowing their bent has led us to the best resources as only God can do. My favorite store is Rainbow Resources: http://www.rainbowresources.com/. Their phone book sized catalog is a little overwhelming, but very comprehensive.

    Here’s a fun book on learning styles that we enjoyed: https://www.amazon.com/Big-What-Book-Learning-Styles/dp/1932096604/ref=sr_1_9?keywords=learning+styles&qid=1551754581&s=gateway&sr=8-9

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Awesome! Thanks!

      Reply
  21. Amy schaaP

    We are using Masterbooks Curriculum and LOVE it!!! I would highly recommend checking them out. They are a fully Biblically integrated curriculum that has a Charlotte Mason flare. I can’t say enough good things about them and I’ve done my research on curriculum! I grew up using Abeka and BJU and it hasn’t changed in 20+ years which isn’t necessarily bad but I love the “fresh” look of updated books and illustrations that make sense for today’s kids. I love the family style learning of MB as well. We plan to use history and science as family subjects for our kids (all four kids are 1 year apart).

    Some “momma” books I would recommend include: “teaching from rest”, “teach them diligently”, “Education: Does God Have an Opinion”?.

    We have the OSMO apps and enjoy those as well.

    Education.com has a lot of worksheets – many are free or you can sign up with them.

    I have a routine chart I created that has been a huge hit on social media. I created a Facebook Page called “Biblical Homeschooling Resources” where I share my family and homeschool helps for free! I want people to have free access to helpful materials!

    May God Bless you as you begin this journey with your kids!! It’s the highest calling we as women have!

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Thanks for all the tips!! I’ll look you up! <3

      Reply
  22. Dee F

    In various instances, I’ve use an online resource, Super Teacher Worksheets, https://www.superteacherworksheets.com/ that has a variety of learning levels/subjects so you can customize lessons and activities. I’m not a home schooler, but do work with children in various activities, and this is great. I especially like that you can create your own word search sheets and customize them to your particular needs. You can also create work by season, holiday, etc., so it’s a fun resource for coloring sheets to enhance lessons. Most activities are free, but you can subscribe for a nominal fee.

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Nice! Thanks for the info.

      Reply
  23. Stephanie

    I can’t wait to follow along with the next generation of homeschoolers in your family! I’m loving it with my four kids. You have to check out The Good and the Beautiful. It starts with PreK so it would be perfect for Israel. It’s so sweet and beautifully done. thegoodandthebeautiful.com

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Thanks!

      Reply
  24. Nicole

    Jill and Derrick

    If you have access to Internet abc mouse is amazing!!!

    When teaching my nephew I do start him off with rhyming and phonics and have him do the same family for phonics and rhyming such as the at family or an etc

    Then I do work with him on math such as tell time and recognizing shapes and identifying them around the house as we learn.

    Sylvan and Kumon besides Bob are also great books as well.

    Reply
  25. Nicole

    Jill

    I’m very happy to hear your son is able to read at 3 years old!!!

    As for workbooks there is also slyvan, Kumon.

    There is also an APP called ABC mouse it’s wonderful it teaches everything from toddler to second grade. You will have to pay but it is well worth your money.

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Nice! I’ve heard of ABC mouse, but haven’t used it yet. Thanks!

      Reply
  26. Missy

    I’ve used Math-U-See with all my boys, which was a good fit. I hope you have a good time raising your children and teaching them at home! I’m in my 24th year of homeschooling; I only have a high school sophomore left at this point. My other sons are grown: an assistant district attorney, a police officer, and one college freshman majoring in engineering.

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Thanks! So encouraging!:-)

      Reply
      • Alissa

        Just a heads up up Math U See is a Common Core based program. We used it until 3rd grade and my son was so far behind. Now we use Abeka for math.
        My boys 3rd and K love Apologia Science and Story of the World for history.
        If you’re looking for a faith based curriculum check out The Good and the Beautiful.

        Reply
        • Derick & Jill

          Thanks for the info!

          Reply
  27. Oona Lee

    Some of my fondest homeschool memories are from the early years when we used Before Five In A Row & then Five In A Row. Such a sweet curriculum.

    Reply
  28. BRooke

    We really like Horizons for Math and All About Reading

    Reply
  29. JamIe

    I hope you’re also going to the library a lot, and reading higher level books to him (I still read to my 14 and 16 year olds!), baking, cooking, growing a garden, involving him in grocery shopping, learning about money and having a checkbook to track allowance, singing, dancing, doing arts and crafts, building, learning about animals, going to museums, the beach, and on nature walks, making up stories, doing lots of pretend play, play dates, and park days! Real life! Good luck to you!

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Oh yes! For sure! Both of the boys love to have fun with life and learning and we give them lots of opportunities and encourage it! I’m sure it will look different at different ages. 🙂

      Reply
  30. darlene

    when the kids were real young, i liked using the ‘enchanted learning’ website. once they got older, i used abeka but still incorporated some of the ‘fun’ things from enchanted learning, like word searches and puzzles whenever possible

    also, once they were older, playing games like yahtzee and life helped for counting and boggle and scrabble for spelling

    Reply
    • Amber

      Jill, my kiddos were all super early readers, too. Best gift you can give curious minds. We’ve used Sonlight curriculum, which is literature-based and I highly recommend it! My 3 are now teens & preteens. But I share not because I know best but only because we’re a low tech house full of readers, too, and I think it might fit your loving, literate, hands-on style.

      And don’t let any naysayers get you down; we’re only here once, and we have to do what we feel is right for our kids. You know them best, not the naysayers! Good luck on your journey. Take lots of pictures. 😉

      Reply
      • Derick & Jill

        Aww. Thanks so much! Super encouraging!

        Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Oh yes! Israel loves games too! Thanks for the info.

      Reply
  31. Ashley Pickrell

    I used Easy Peasy All in One Homeschool curriculum when I first started with my oldest, around age 4-5. It’s online, free, and Christian. Before that I didn’t use a curriculum, just taught him letters and their sounds and sight words. He picked up reading quick! We switched to Classical Conversations when my 2 youngest were born (2 under 2 ) because I needed the accountability of being in a group. Otherwise in my sleep deprived state, my oldest would get no schooling. I like the classical method of teaching, my oldest has a great memory but isn’t fond of workbooks. He uses Teaching Textbooks for his math curriculum which has been working out well for him.

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Thanks!

      Reply
  32. JG221

    I homeschool my 7 year old and my 3 year old son had started to be interested in having his own school. So I recently started making time for his own schooling and being more intentiona with his academic and social activities. I currently use:
    All About Reading Level 1 as well as Bob books and leveled readers from the library for phonics and reading
    Singapore Essentials K and traditional board and card games for math
    Coloring, playdoh, and crafts for fine motor control
    Lots of running, kicking, jumping, and throwing for gross motor
    Library books, iPad apps, TV shows and discussion for geography, history, science, art, music, and more
    Library storytime and dance to work on listening to other adults and following directions
    Both structured and unstructured play time with friends and his sister as much as possible

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Awesome! Thanks for sharing.

      Reply
  33. Stephanie Niesing

    Hi Jill and Derick my kids are abeka kids they love the curriculum my son is even writing in cursive. And he is only 5. an amazing program love love love it. All three of my kids have gone above and beyond what I thought they would. Love yall. God Bless the Dillards.
    Stay Awesome
    Stephanie Niesing
    Homeschool mom of 8 yrs. ♡

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Yay! Thanks.

      Reply
  34. Steph

    I have four kids, ranging from 11 to 3yo. With my first, we started doing formal school at 4. She liked it and it worked well for her. But as we have had more kids, I have learned that pushing early isn’t always best. So we aren’t doing anything formal with the youngest until he is 4, and then it will be very light.
    We use Heart of Dakota as our base, with Horizons math though 6th grade at least. So the youngest will start their Little Hands to Heaven program when he is about 4yo, which covers letters, numbers, and colors (plus Bible, devotional, and some science and art). If he really asks for more school, I will add in the Rod and Staff ABC series.. Around 5 we will start formal math, phonics, and handwriting, as he is ready. But if he isn’t ready to learn to read until 6 or 7, we won’t push it. I pushed it with my second born, and it was too our determent. He just want ready, and I think it actually just his ability to read. It is like forcing a child to walk when they aren’t ready – it doesn’t really help!

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Good thoughts! I like following the kid’s motivation and interests to a point too. 🙂 Thanks for sharing.

      Reply
  35. Heather N

    Two preschool curriculum that I love are “Little Hands to Heaven” from Heart of Dakota and “Weaver Interlock” that plans lessons around the days of creation. It is sold by Alpha Omega Publications now. Sounds like Israel is doing great!

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      Awesome thanks!

      Reply
  36. Shannon b

    Thanks for sharing! This fall I’m going to start homeschooling my daughter (she’s 2) and chose Memoria Press preschool, but i’ll be looking into the resources you shared! (I currently have no idea what I’m doing…. hoping it comes naturally!!)

    Reply
    • Derick & Jill

      That’s awesome! Maybe you could find a homeschool convention/conference in your area? I know they can be super helpful. I’m hoping to go to some in the near future!

      Reply

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